Ten Women

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We are bombarded with sexualised images of semi-naked women in the media on a daily basis, from billboards plastered with underwear ads to HBO’s Game of Thrones. These media-manipulated snapshots of our society suggest it is materialistic, consumer-driven, and unrealistically obsessed with the perfect figure. There’s an idea out there that sex sells, and the female body has become its common currency. We are being persuaded to accept these airbrushed images as part of our daily lives, and it’s no surprise that many women end up feeling inadequate as a result.

The way women see themselves and their bodies is the subject under the spotlight in Ten Women, at the Ovalhouse, Kennington Oval, London SE11.
During rehearsals for the show, a group of women of all shapes and sizes attended a workshop to discuss the following issues:

 “What if the way women are portrayed and how we are told we should look is feeding a culture of critique and self-hatred? What is this view of women is trapping us? What if it’s damaging all of us, men and women?”

High on the agenda in the workshop discussions were the sexualised images of women in the media. Among those under fire were the clothes store H&M, for its traffic-stopping underwear ads, and a scene from TV’s True Detective featuring a sex scene with a fully-clothed man and half naked woman. The inclusion of unnecessary scenes of female nudity in the TV series Game of Thrones came in for particular criticism. The medieval fantasy books by George R R Martin are already heavy on the themes of sex and death, but the TV production has added further controversial scenes of violence against women, presumably on the grounds that no publicity is bad publicity. 

 Faced with all these idealised images and icons of perfection in the media, it may be impossible for any normal, natural female to measure up: but most people would still agree that real women, in all their infinite variety, are preferable to any fantasy.

TEN WOMEN is presented by Jackdaw and written and directed by Bethan Dear. Part of Ovalhouse’s FiRST BiTES series of new performance pieces, currently in development and presented as work-in-progress showings.

Contains adult themes and content.

Tue 27 May – Sat 31 May, 7:30pm

Tickets: £5.00 BOOK /  BOX OFFICE: 020 7582 7680

 

 

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~ by A_A on May 19, 2014.

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